Lean Canvas: A Business Model Tool That Doesn’t Suck

The Lean Canvas (created by Ash Maurya) is a tool to help founders accomplish three main tasks:  Accept and work with uncertainty rather than ignore it or try to cover it up. Identify and address risk as early as possible in the startup process.  Create a blueprint or...

No-Code: A Way to Build Your Next Product

This is a complete guide to building with no-code tools In this in-depth guide you’ll learn: What is no-codeWhy you should research no-codeWhat are no-code toolsNo-code best practicesPlus lots more So, if you’re ready to go “all in” with building with no-code tools,...

Minimum Viable Products

This is a complete guide to building a minimum viable product (MVP). In this in-depth guide you’ll learn: What is a Minimum Viable ProductHow to build a Minimum Viable ProductTypes of Minimum Viable ProductsPlus lots more So if you’re ready to go “all in” with...

Development Shops: How To Choose a Development Shop to Build Your Product

This is a complete guide to building your product by enlisting help from a development shop. In this in-depth guide you’ll learn: Is a development shop right for your businessWhat to watch out for when working with development shopsHow to have success with development...

Types of Product Prototypes: Learn the Ins and Outs

This is a complete guide to building a prototype of your product. In this detailed guide you’ll learn: What is a prototypeDifferent types of prototypesHow to choose a prototypePlus lots more So, if you’re ready to build your prototype, this guide is for you. ...
Lean Canvas: A Business Model Tool That Doesn’t Suck

Lean Canvas: A Business Model Tool That Doesn’t Suck

The Lean Canvas accommodates and highlights this uncertainty by staying high level. There is no false sense of certainty here. In the early days, there are simply things we can not know. The Lean Canvas assumes this and helps guide the user down a path of progressive discovery, thus removing uncertainty.

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Minimum Viable Products

Minimum Viable Products

A Minimum Viable Product is the nexus of these two ideas: narrow scope with a bias towards learning. It is a tool to help you build out an idea, test it in the market, and learn from its performance so you can iterate on it.

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Types of Product Prototypes: Learn the Ins and Outs

Types of Product Prototypes: Learn the Ins and Outs

There are lots of heated debates about where the line is drawn between MVPs and Prototypes, but we want to make this simple for you to understand by creating a simple heuristic:

If it creates value and a customer will trade something of value to use it, it’s an MVP. If it doesn’t create value, it’s a Prototype.

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Customer Discovery for First-Time Founders

Customer Discovery for First-Time Founders

Once we’ve got this hypothesis created, it’s time to test it! And the first way we do that is by talking to potential users.

Now, you may be asking yourself, who is my potential user? Well, chances are you already have a pretty good idea in mind, but just like our hypothesis should be specific and measurable, so should our ideal user profile be, too.

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Avoid The Software Sinkhole

Avoid The Software Sinkhole

There’s a distinctly different set of tactics and methods used to develop digital products. There’s a very good reason for this!

You see, with digital products like mobile apps, websites, or web applications, there are almost always more unknowns than knowns. Unlike, say, a sneaker which we have a very well defined process and archetype for building, software just doesn’t come with a manual.

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3 Reasons You Should Build a Digital Product And One Reason You Shouldn’t

3 Reasons You Should Build a Digital Product And One Reason You Shouldn’t

Digital Products are mobile apps, websites, web applications, and more. Essentially, if it’s made of lines of code and lives on a computing device, you’ve got a digital product on your hands.

As you can probably tell from this description, there are lots of different kinds of digital products for just as many kinds of applications and uses. But they aren’t always the right fit for some use cases.

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